Food & Safety

By Health and Safety

This message is a reminder about food safety with respect to our eggs. Some of the info below is common sense but we feel we should remind you about some egg handling practices. Salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria that can be present in raw or undercooked food. Salmonella enteritidis is a type of salmonella bacteria which can be found outside and inside the egg.

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Why are some hard-cooked eggs difficult to peel?

By Health and Safety

Hard-cooked eggs may be difficult to peel if they are very fresh. This is because an egg shrinks inside during storage, which pulls the inner membrane away from the inside of the shell. For this reason, a hard-cooked egg will peel more easily if it has been stored for one or two weeks before it is cooked. After boiling the eggs, crack the shell all over by tapping gently, then hold under running water to make peeling easier. Eggs may also be harder to peel if they are not cooked long enough. Hard cooked eggs should be kept refrigerated and used within one week

What are meat spots?

By Health and Safety

Most meat spots are tiny pieces of tissue from the hen’s oviduct. They are usually brown in color, and found in the thick albumen, chalazae, or the yolk. They range in size from 0.5 mm to more than 3 mm in diameter. They are sterile and harmless. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife, if you wish. The incidence of meat spots ranges from less than 3% to 30% or more. It varies with the strain of bird, increases with the age of bird and may be higher in brown eggs. Many meat spots are too small to be detected by candling, especially in brown eggs.

What are blood spots?

By Health and Safety

Contrary to popular belief, these tiny spots do not indicate a fertilized egg or the presence of a disease. Rather, they are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel on the yolk surface during formation of the egg or by a similar accident in the wall of the oviduct. Less than 1% of all eggs produced have blood spots. Candling methods reveal most eggs with blood spots and those eggs are removed but, even with electronic spotters, it is impossible to catch all of them in the candling process, especially in brown eggs due to the darker color shell. As an egg ages, the yolk takes up water from the albumen to dilute the blood spot so, in actuality, a blood spot indicates that the egg is fresh. Both chemically and nutritionally, these eggs are fit to eat. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife, if you wish.

Small Flock Workshops

By Uncategorized

Through our partnership with Peavey Mart we put on two small flock workshops.

This year in April, through our partnership with Peavey Mart we put on two small flock workshops. The workshops were held in Spruce Grove and Red Deer.  The workshops are intended to help answer some questions that new chicken owners face as well as seasoned chicken owners to improve their operation. Supporters of these events include Peavey Mart, Young Agrarians, the University of Alberta, and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry.

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Novelty Items

By Uncategorized

This year Rachelle (newest animal technician) and I (the egg lady) wanted to do something different for our girls. So why not put something new in the pens and watch the girls play! We both must be 90’s kids because after humming and hawing thinking of what we should place in the pens we came up with CD’s.

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